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Error migrating DHCP database to Windows Server 2008 from Windows 2003 Server

Finally back to the blogsphere. I’ve decided to use my blog as a repository for issues & stuff I come across that I want to document. We’ll see how long this lasts.

On the first day back at work, I ran across an interesting issue while migrating the DHCP server in our lab from a physical 2003 server to a virtual 2008 R2. Clients without reservations were receiving addresses, but were not being displayed in the DHCP mmc (Statistics showed IPs in use). However, clients with reservations were not getting their IPs. Also, reservations would not show DHCP in mmc and no addresses were under the Address Lease node. The folder which normally displays a clock had a red X. After doing some searching I ran across an article on social.technet.com. First, was a discussion on a difference between 2003 and 2008 R2 in regards to leases. In 2003, you could create a reservation for servers that fell outside of the available IP range. I had used this to keep track of IP’s within DHCP instead of a spreadsheet or other document. However, it appears 2008 R2 does not support this. I’m not sure on Server 2008 since I skipped over it.

Here’s how I fixed my issue:

1. On the source DHCP server, I deleted all leases that fell outside of the available range. This range includes specified exclusionary ranges as well as undefined ranges.

2. I exported the DHCP database using Netsh: netsh dhcp server export ALL

3. On my destination server, I stopped the DHCPServer service and deleted c:windowssystem32dhcpdhcp.mdb

4. After deleting the database, I started the DHCPServer service.

5. I imported the DHCP database using Netsh: netsh dhcp server import ALL





6. Upon opening the DHCP mmc, I was able to see all leases as well as reservations. Also, all clients previously using reservations now received IP addresses.

Thanks to the Sainath IRP_MY_Create on Network Infrastructure Servers forum on social.technet.com for assistance on this!

About Michael Bender

Just a geek trying to "share the wealth" with the rest of the world... Michael is a teacher at heart. Coming from a career teaching at a community college and work for 19 years as a system engineer, his passion is for helping people learn the skills necessary to ‘level-up’ their careers, and helping businesses achieve their customer goals. Sharing everything is how he guides his career as everyone wins when you share what you know. Currently, he is a Cloud Ops Advocate at Microsoft. This team focuses on engaging and advocating for Operations-focused communities to the engineering teams in Windows Azure. You’ll find Michael and his #AzOps team at conferences, online, and building great content at docs.com. Michael specializes in Windows Server, Virtualization, PowerShell and Windows Azure. As part of his goal of sharing his knowledge, he has a number of courses published on Pluralsight.com covering PowerShell and Windows Server. He is passionate about the IT Operations community. For the last 8 years, he has led up a global user group called The Krewe.he is the current president and a founding member of The Krewe, a worldwide networking group for IT Pros and Developers. This group provides a global network for the sharing of ideas and solutions for many in the Operations community. For more information, check out The Krewe on Facebook or Twitter.
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4 thoughts on “Error migrating DHCP database to Windows Server 2008 from Windows 2003 Server

  1. I've run into similar issues where 2003 would you let you do certain things that 2008 didn't like. In my case it had to do with failover cluster IP addresses.

    It is a shame there isn't a resource where some of these behavior changes were documented so you could be ready for them before you make the move, not after them when things aren't working.

  2. I've run into similar issues where 2003 would you let you do certain things that 2008 didn't like. In my case it had to do with failover cluster IP addresses.

    It is a shame there isn't a resource where some of these behavior changes were documented so you could be ready for them before you make the move, not after them when things aren't working.

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